Philadelphia Scar Injury Attorney

Many different types of accidents can lead to scaring. Whether it’s a car accident, trip and fall or injury from a defective product any time there is a significant wound there is a strong possibility a scar will result. Scars are the direct result of the healing process after which the skin has sustained serious injury. The specific injury could be the result of an accident or surgical procedure. A scar is the end result after the skin has healed and repaired the open wound naturally. A scar can be a significant component to a personal injury claim. Depending on the location of the scar and the severity the value for that portion of the claim alone could exceed 100,000 dollars. At the Philadelphia law firm of Rosenbaum and Associates, a Philadelphia scar injury lawyer will often employ plastic surgeons to evaluate the cost scar revision surgery and confirm permanency to maximize the value of your recovery. We will get you the compensation you deservee.

Characteristics

  • Scar tissue is less resistant to ultraviolet radiation. This means it will likely sunburn more quickly than healthy skin. It contains no sweat glands or hair follicles. The damaged skin cannot produce sweat, natural oil, or hair.
  • They are generally smooth and slightly raised due to the growth pattern of the new skin which creates the new skin tissue. Some are slightly sunken recesses within the skin, as with those caused by chickenpox or acne.
  • Scars may be the product of a work injury, pregnancy, or anything which causes the body to need to heal itself. They usually appear within 4-8 weeks of the original injury. Some scars extend past the original site of the injury and may become painful.

Types

  • Hypertrophic: These are produced when the body produces an abundance of collagen. The appearance is generally a raised lump on the skin. These are often the result of traumatic injury to the skin.
  • Keloid: This is more serious, as they often grow into large timorous benign neoplasms. All keloid scars are hypertrophic, but not all hypertrophics are keloids. These occur more frequently in people of darker skin.
  • Contracture: Burned skin results in contracture scarring, which causes the skin to become very tight. Contracture scars often impair movement, as movement stretches the skin. These may even affect muscles and nerves in serious burn cases.
  • Atrophic: These are sunken recesses in the skin, often with a pitted appearance. Chickenpox, acne, surgery, or accidents may cause atrophic scarring.
  • Stretch Marks: Most often occurring during pregnancy or during periods of rapid and significant weight gain when too much tension is put on the skin. Stretch marks may also occur in children and teens that experience growth spurts.

Treatments

Most treatments for scar tissue include chemical peels, collagen or other filler injections, dermabrasion, laser treatment, or radiotherapy. Some ointments are used in conjunction with pressure dressing to reduce the overall appearance. Surgery performed by an experienced plastic surgeon may reduce the appearance. Nothing has proven to completely remove scars and leave no trace of them. Scars are often the result of a work related injury. Chemical burns and other work injuries are often a source of intense pain with serious scarring as the end result. Unsightly scars often cause problems beyond appearance for the victim, as some are painful reminders of the original injury. Work related scarring may qualify a person for worker’s compensation and medical reimbursement. Disfigurement, scarring on the face or neck, or those which are a different color from healthy skin color may qualify the victim for worker’s compensation benefits. The most common compensation for scars is a lump sum payment through worker’s compensation.

Related practice areas: Car Accidents , Slip and Fall , Defective Products.